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Thread: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

  1. #21
    Waverunner Mars S's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Quote Originally Posted by VERITAS View Post
    Maliki and Gaddafi have been evoking the al Qaeda boogie man that has worked so well for so many, but Moammar would have done well to remain nebulous as to their methodology.
    Of course even a child could point out what you missed. Al Qaeda really IS a problem in Iraq and Maliki was elected.
    Your mind is clouded, evidently by some drug or alcohol. How else to explain such persistent stupidity in your assertions?

    "The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is "Look under foot." You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think. The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are. Do not despise your own place and hour."
    - John Burroughs

    I never learned anything from someone who agreed with me. R.A.H.

    "Don't Pilobolate me, bro"

  2. #22
    Waverunner Mars S's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Quote Originally Posted by Bman View Post
    What part of "Feed your People, BITCHES" don't they get?
    I don't know, what part of it don't you get?
    http://www.iraq-businessnews.com/201...t-65m-of-rice/
    http://www.iraq-businessnews.com/201...l-prices-rise/

    I always wonder why you defeaticrats have such limited curiosity about a modern state climbing out of a hole dug by it's former gov't. Apparently, all either you or vertigo is good for is posting propaganda.
    "The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is "Look under foot." You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think. The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are. Do not despise your own place and hour."
    - John Burroughs

    I never learned anything from someone who agreed with me. R.A.H.

    "Don't Pilobolate me, bro"

  3. #23
    Moral High Ground VERITAS's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq


    A 'day of rage' inspired by movements in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere ends with at least 11 dead and buildings in flames. Demonstrators try to push into the heavily protected Green Zone in Baghdad.

    .
    Anti-riot forces members hit a protester during a demonstration in Kerbala, Iraq.

    By Alice Fordham and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times

    3:45 PM PST, February 25, 2011

    Reporting from Baghdad

    Anti-government protests across Iraq on Friday led to violent clashes between some demonstrators and security forces, leaving at least 11 people dead and many buildings in flames.

    Inspired by protests in countries such as Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, Iraqis marched outside official buildings and in town centers calling for less corruption, more jobs and better public services as part of a "day of rage."

    Protesters reportedly were killed in the cities of Mosul, Hawija, Tikrit and Kalar.

    In Baghdad, witnesses said security forces fired live ammunition and used water cannons and tear gas to disperse the crowd. Many people were beaten and chased through the streets. No deaths were reported in the Iraqi capital.

    As many as 5,000 people, mainly young men, had massed in Baghdad's Tahrir Square in the late morning. They tried to push past a barrier of blast walls over the Jumhuriya Bridge and into the heavily protected Green Zone, site of the parliament and politicians' homes. 


    As the protesters toppled part of the barrier, hundreds of riot police officers marched over the bridge to block their path. The officers came under a hail of stones as angry demonstrators chanted that Prime Minister Nouri Maliki was a liar and that they would not leave.

    "Most people want to get inside the Green Zone and ask Maliki where the country's money is," said Adel, 33, a taxi driver who did not want to give his last name. "Is it under his bed, or did he send it to Iran to build nuclear weapons to attack Iraq?"

    Iraqi police sources said two journalists were arrested.

    The demonstrations were launched despite warnings from security forces and officials, including Maliki, that terrorists might target crowds of protesters.

    Ayatollah Ali Sistani, the leading religious figure for Iraq's Shiite majority, and other clerics urged people not to attend the protests. The anti-Western cleric and politician Muqtada Sadr, who returned to Iraq from his Iranian residence this week, told his followers to give the government six months to improve services.

    The day of protests had been planned and discussed on social networking sites and by civil society organizations.

    "I'm asking, if the government is saying we can have peaceful protests, why do they stop us?" said Abu Saif, 60, a retired government employee demonstrating in Baghdad. "Are they worried? We voted for them.... Do you see any stick or gun in anyone's hand?"

    In Mosul, health ministry officials said five people had been killed. Government buildings were set afire in Anbar province in western Iraq, and three people were killed in demonstrations in Hawija, near the northern city of Kirkuk. Two deaths were reported in Tikrit and one in Kalar.

    In the southern oil hub of Basra, where protesters surrounded the provincial building, the governor, Sheltagh Abboud, resigned.

    Sajad Kathim, 23, a student at Baghdad University, said Iraqis had been inspired by Egyptians' demand for change and wanted solutions to their problems.

    "We don't want to bring anyone down, we voted for these people, we have democracy" he said. "But they have to change."

    Hanna Edwar, a lawyer and civil society activist, said she expected more demonstrations.

    "People are worried about the situation," she said. "They have to continue."

    Fordham is a special correspondent and Salman a staff writer in The Times' Baghdad bureau.
    ...

  4. #24
    Waverunner Mars S's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    I suppose we could be concerned but really, it IS within the authority of the local constabulary to maintain order. By suppressing hooligans if necessary. It sucks that the Iraqis are learning how to run their country and experiencing rough patches. What a shame. With a million cellphones in the country you'd think they'd be able to get food shipments worked out. And lord knows that Facebook is getting a LOT of action.
    "DAYS OF RAGE you and 34 others like this"
    And then maybe they could do something about the room service.
    "The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is "Look under foot." You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think. The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are. Do not despise your own place and hour."
    - John Burroughs

    I never learned anything from someone who agreed with me. R.A.H.

    "Don't Pilobolate me, bro"

  5. #25
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Iraqis defy checkpoints, vehicle bans in demos

    (AP) – 6 hours ago

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Thousands rallied across Baghdad and elsewhere in Iraq on Friday in anti-government demonstrations that defied security checkpoints and a vehicle ban that forced many to walk for hours to the heart of the capital.
    It was the second Friday in a row of Iraqi demonstrations — a show of force that has unnerved officials worried that the turmoil in the rest of the region is spreading here.
    The rallies, inspired by revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia, have concentrated on demands for improved government services, better pay and an end to corruption in Iraq. They also reflect the level of unhappiness many Iraqis feel nearly eight years after the fall of Saddam Hussein.
    "Our country is lost and for the last eight years the government has failed to offer services for people. Thousands of youths are without jobs," said Bahjat Talib.
    He said he walked from the vast slum in eastern Baghdad called Sadr City through eight checkpoints to get to the square. Talib said he had to tell security forces that he was going to work or they would not let him pass.
    He was one of about 2,000 demonstrators in and around Liberation Square, surrounded by hundreds of security forces.
    The Iraqi government, worried the demonstrations may spiral out of control, have taken strict measures that appear designed to limit the number of demonstrators who come out. Late Thursday, they imposed a vehicle ban in the capital so many of the protesters were forced to walk for miles. Similar vehicle bans were in place in at least ten cities across Iraq from the northern city of Mosul, to Saddam Hussein's hometown of Tikrit, to the southern city of Basra.
    Hana Adwar, an Iraqi political activist, said she'd received several calls from friends on the western side of the city who had been prevented by security forces from crossing the Tigris River to get to eastern Baghdad where the square is located.
    But instead of simply staying home, protesters held demos in different locations across the capital. Hundreds of people organized a rally in western Baghdad's Mansour neighborhood. And in the Sunni neighborhood of Azamiyah, hundreds of people gathered in front of the revered Abu Khanifa mosque after Friday prayers shouting: "Liar, liar, Nouri al-Maliki is a liar!"
    At Liberation Square, side streets were blocked with security vehicles and helicopters buzzed overhead. The bridge leading from the square to the Green Zone, home to the U.S. Embassy and the Iraqi prime minister's residence, was blocked off with razor wire and concrete barriers.
    A long row of riot police stood at the entrance to the bridge, preventing protesters from going further.
    The bridge was the site of repeated clashes last Friday between protesters who tried to cross the bridge and threw rocks at the security forces who beat them back with batons and chucked the stones back.
    Iraqi security forces around the country clashed last Friday with protesters in the most widespread and violent demonstrations the country has seen since a wave of unrest began spreading across the Middle East. At least 14 people were killed in those rallies, that raised questions about the use of force by Iraqi security officials.
    Both the U.S. and the U.N. earlier this week said they were disturbed by reports of abuse of force by the security forces during the protests against journalists and activists.
    Before those protests, Iraqi officials sounded a drumbeat of warnings about the demonstrations, saying they were being backed by supporters of Saddam Hussein and al-Qaida. The warnings seemed designed to keep people away and paint those who did take part in a bad light.
    Demonstrators this Friday took measures to protect themselves, evidencing the distrust many feel toward the security forces. Kamil al-Assadi, from Sadr city, formed a committee checking demonstrators entering the square because they were worried the security forces might plant people in the crowd to create problems.
    "We do not trust the Iraqi security forces and formed a committee to check the demonstrators to make sure that no one is carrying a knife or any kind of weapon who aims at creating any problems during the demo."
    In the southern city of Basra, about 1,000 people converged on the Basra provincial council building. Last week the protests in the city led to the resignation of the governor. This week they were demanding that the provincial council step down and essential services such as water and electricity be improved.
    Demonstrations were also held in the cities of Mosul and Tikrit.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...99270536b3c92b
    Last edited by Bman; 03-04-2011 at 10:41 AM.
    Of course, none of these extraordinary events would ever have happened if not for Bush and he retires with the most astounding successes achieved by any president in recent memory. -- Mars S, January 2009

  6. #26
    Waverunner Mars S's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Ahh! Is there anything as refreshing as the spasms of a reborn country? People discover the limits of their society and, endeavor to persevere.
    "The lesson which life repeats and constantly enforces is "Look under foot." You are always nearer the divine and the true sources of your power than you think. The lure of the distant and the difficult is deceptive. The great opportunity is where you are. Do not despise your own place and hour."
    - John Burroughs

    I never learned anything from someone who agreed with me. R.A.H.

    "Don't Pilobolate me, bro"

  7. #27
    The Professor Bman's Avatar
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Quote Originally Posted by Mars S View Post
    Ahh! Is there anything as refreshing as the spasms of a reborn country? People discover the limits of their society and, endeavor to persevere.

    The only thing more refreshing, is a nice splash of the water cannon!


    I agree with you.. I think its great that they're demanding a government that serves the people!


    Iraqi forces use water cannon to disperse protests


    Fri, Mar 4 2011
    By Aref Mohammed
    BASRA, Iraq (Reuters) -Iraqi security forces used water cannon and batons to disperse protesters in the southern oil hub of Basra on Friday as thousands of Iraqis rallied around the nation against corrupt officials and poor basic services.

    Demonstrations against a shortage of jobs, electricity, water and other basic services have been rising as Iraqis, inspired by protests around the Arab world, demand reforms from a formed in December after elections last year.

    In central Basra around 700 protesters near the provincial council building were forcibly removed by Iraqi soldiers and police after they refused to stop demonstrating.
    A Reuters reporter at the scene said some journalists were also beaten by security forces. A vehicle ban was in effect.

    "I have been applying for a job for six years and did not get one so far. They (officials) ask for bribes to employ people," said 30-year-old Noor Mohammed, a graduate from Basra University's engineering faculty.

    "I regret electing those people because their democracy is that people should smile at (Prime Minister Nuri) al-Maliki and should say nothing to him."

    Some protesters carried a piece of wood that was carved in the shape of Iraq. A medical tube was attached to the wood, symbolizing Iraq as a weak body.

    Thousands of Iraqis rallied nationwide last Friday against corruption and poor services. At least 10 people died and scores were wounded in clashes between protesters and security forces.

    Unlike other countries in the region where protesters have demanded the ouster of long-ruling autocrats, Iraq saw dictator Saddam Hussein removed eight years ago by a U.S.-led invasion.

    But despite having the power to elect their leaders, the public is still widely unhappy with a political system that has left figures with ethnic and sectarian power bases entrenched in office and failed so far to restore basic services.

    Many protests have taken place provincial capitals, where Iraq's decentralized system concentrates power in the hands of regional bosses.

    On Friday, around 3,000 people gathered in Celebration Square in Mosul to protest against corruption. Some held pictures of relatives who were killed in last Friday's protests.

    Hundreds also rallied in the southern towns of Nassiriya, Garma and Faw. A vehicle ban was in effect in the cities of Baghdad, Mosul, Sulaimaniya and in Salahuddin province.

    100-DAY DEADLINE

    Oil-rich Iraq, which has the potential to become a major oil producer, has been slow to develop and re-build infrastructure, badly battered after decades of war and economic sanctions.
    In the capital, Baghdad, around 2,000 Iraqis gathered in central Tahrir Square for a second consecutive Friday.

    Some carried banners reading "where is the petrol money going Maliki?" and "people want reform," while others called for better education and health systems.

    Politicians have moved to soothe anger by cutting their own salaries, doling out free electricity, buying sugar for a food ration program and diverting money from fighter jets to food.

    Maliki told his ministers on Sunday they had 100 days to step up reforms or be fired after last Friday's "Day of Rage."

    "The 100-day ultimatum Maliki gave will not provide any satisfactory results. I am sure that even if this government is given years, it will not do anything because it is a wishy-washy government and was established on a power-sharing basis," said retired traffic police officer Jamal Farhan.

    "These protests will continue until our demands are met," he added, while protesting in Tahrir Square.

    Maliki secured a second term last year in a power-sharing deal between Shi'ite, Sunni and Kurdish factions following nine months of political wrangling after an inconclusive March vote. (Additional reporting by Jamal al-Badrani in Mosul, Muhanad Mohammed in Baghdad, Shamal Aqrawi in Arbil; Writing by Serena Chaudhry)


    http://www.reuters.com/assets/print?...7233UK20110304
    Last edited by Bman; 03-05-2011 at 10:09 AM.
    Of course, none of these extraordinary events would ever have happened if not for Bush and he retires with the most astounding successes achieved by any president in recent memory. -- Mars S, January 2009

  8. #28
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Pressure building in Kurdistan

    http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurds/3506.html


    ERBIL, Iraqi Kurdistan: A leading independent Kurdish lawmaker in the Iraqi parliament is warning of the increasing peril Iraqi Kurdistan is facing from the current unrest in Sulaimani province, and the pressing need for the major political parties to talk with each other. Meanwhile, the parties themselves are all claiming openness and blaming each other for the present hostile relationship among them.

    “The danger will grow if the tensions are not resolved, especially since 40 percent of Kurdistan’s territory is under the control of Baghdad, and Turkey and Iran are stabbing us in the back,” said Mahmoud Osman, a veteran of Kurdish politics and an ex-peshmarga in the resistance against Saddam Hussein.

    Osman cautioned that the current political and media warfare in Kurdistan was “more dangerous than a real war with weapons, because it provokes the people.”
    Sulaimani province has been the scene of ongoing protests for the past three weeks, leading to the death of eight people, including a policeman, and the injuring of dozens more.


    Continued at link
    Last edited by Bman; 03-18-2011 at 11:57 AM.
    Of course, none of these extraordinary events would ever have happened if not for Bush and he retires with the most astounding successes achieved by any president in recent memory. -- Mars S, January 2009

  9. #29
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    FEATURE - Protests revolutionise political culture of Iraq Kurds


    Fri, Mar 25 2011
    By Namo Abdulla
    SULAIMANIYA, Iraq (Reuters) - Protests sweeping North Africa and the Middle East have transformed Iraq's Kurdish region, where an angry public is awakening to political life beyond the authoritarian leaders once seen as heroic liberators.
    In other parts of Iraq, protests inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia have tapered off over the past month.
    In Kurdistan, where two political parties have jointly dominated public life for two decades, demonstrators have remained steadfast, camping out for more than a month in a square in the region's second-largest city, Sulaimaniya.
    At least nine people have died, including two members of the "Peshmerga", the two ruling parties' former guerrilla armies which are now the region's official security forces.
    Many Kurds say it is the first time they have been able to envisage a Kurdistan that does not revolve around the parties, whose epic struggle against dictator Saddam Hussein dominated Kurdish culture as much as their patronage dominated politics.
    "What is happening now in Kurdistan is a radical change in the Kurdish political landscape," said Bachtyar Ali, whose 1992 poetry collection "Sin and the Carnival" and magical realist novels marked a Kurdish cultural renaissance that flowered after the region broke free of Saddam's grip in 1991.
    "We are abandoning the classic form of 20th century governance which indoctrinated us with the notions that ideologies, parties and the president were all sacred," he told Reuters. "We will certainly never return to pre-February 17th Kurdistan," he added, referring to the first day of protests.

    BOOM NOT SHARED
    President Massoud Barzani's KDP party and its sometime rivals, the PUK of Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, have been revered as founding national liberation movements since the U.S.-led Gulf War against Saddam in 1991, when their fighters secured de facto independence shielded by a Western no-fly zone.
    It was the first time the Kurdish people -- who have also fought for autonomy in Turkey, Iran and Syria -- had ever secured control of the apparatus of a modern state.
    The two parties' rival Peshmerga units fought each other in a civil war in the 1990s, but since Saddam was toppled in 2003 they have held to a deal dividing power between them.
    The region has flourished as the only part of Iraq spared the ethnic and sectarian war of the last eight years. Sulaimaniya and regional capital Arbil have seen building booms.
    Baghdad gives the Kurdish regional government near-total autonomy and 17 percent of Iraq's oil wealth, an annual budget of about $11 billion for a region of some 4.5 million people.
    Foreign investors have arrived en masse, including more than 40 oil companies negotiating deals with the Kurdish authorities, even though rules have yet to be set for how to share export revenues from Kurdish oil with Baghdad.
    But many Kurds complain that they have seen little of the new wealth. Far too much power has been concentrated in the hands of the parties, and their duopoly has allowed corruption to run rampant and dissent to be stifled, protesters say.
    Sulaimaniya's protesters have been chanting "down, down, down with the authorities," echoing slogans heard across North Africa and the Middle East this year.
    Protests have been more tense and bloodier in less-developed towns such as Chamchamal, Kalar and Halabja -- notorious site of a poison gas attack by Saddam's forces in 1988. At times they have taken on the character of a class struggle, with poor protesters demanding clean water, electricity and jobs.
    Foreign investors complain too. Khalil Shocair, general manager of Green House, a Jordanian firm which has provided 70 percent of Sulaimaniyah's greenhouses since 2003, said business deals require the blessing of one of the ruling parties.
    "If you don't have the support of a political party here, you will never win," he said. "You will not get a work visa, for example."
    Barzani has issued dire warnings to protesters about the perils of trying to overthrow the authorities from the streets, but, like other Middle East leaders caught in the tide of public anger, he has also acknowledged the validity of the discontent.
    "Your demonstrations are a legitimate act... Meeting your demands is my obligation and the government's," he said in a speech this week promising "radical reforms" within four months.
    Shukriya Mohammed Kareem, a 53-year-old housewife, said the government was not using its wealth to look after the poor.
    "My husband is 31 years retired. But I only get 200,000 Iraqi dinars ($170) a month. I have a son and six daughters. I have come here just to say I don't want this government," she said at protests this week in Sulaimaniya.
    "What's the good of a government which does nothing for you and just fills its officials pockets up with money?"
    (Editing by Peter Graff and Louise Ireland)


    http://in.reuters.com/article/2011/0...55877520110325
    Of course, none of these extraordinary events would ever have happened if not for Bush and he retires with the most astounding successes achieved by any president in recent memory. -- Mars S, January 2009

  10. #30
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    Default Re: 1000s of Kurdish Antigovernment rioters take to the streets of Iraq

    Iraqi Kurd leader hints at secession

    Published April 25, 2012
    Associated Press

    The president of Iraq's self-rule Kurdish region demanded Wednesday that Shiite leaders agree on sharing power with their political opponents by September or else the Kurds could consider breaking away from Baghdad.

    The warning by Kurdish President Massoud Barzani in an interview with The Associated Press underscores that Shiite domination in Iraq's government is reviving secession dreams that the now departed American military had tried to contain.

    "What threatens the unity of Iraq is dictatorship and authoritarian rule," Barzani said in a 45-minute interview in his sprawling office outside of Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish region he leads in northern Iraq. "If Iraq heads toward a democratic state, then there will be no trouble. But if Iraq heads toward a dictatorial state, then we will not be able to live with dictatorship."

    He called it a "very dangerous political crisis in the country" and said the impasse must be broken by September, when voters in the Kurdish region may consider a referendum for a state independent of Iraq.
    "They have to decide if they are willing to accept to live under a dictatorial regime or not," Barzani said. "They have to make that decision. It is their natural right."

    Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's media adviser, Ali al-Moussawi, declined immediate comment.

    The specter of a divided Iraq has been discussed -- and dismissed by many -- for months. Barzani said Wednesday that he is still committed to negotiating a compromise before promoting secession. But he insisted it will be an option if the government logjam continues for much longer.

    Barzani is the highest-ranking Iraqi official to disavow al-Maliki's government for sidelining its political opponents and, in some cases, persecuting them in what critics call an unabashed power grab. He stopped short of demanding that al-Maliki step down to ease the crisis. But he left little doubt that tensions between the central government in Baghdad and the three-province Kurdish region have reached a new high.
    Iraq expert Ramzy Mardini, with the Institute for the Study of War in Washington, said Barzani's comments likely are aimed more at getting al-Maliki to bend to Kurds on some positions instead of containing a real threat to secede. He noted that Kurds are years away from having enough oil and gas infrastructure to produce the resources necessary to support an independent state.

    Oil disputes -- specifically Baghdad's blacklisting of ExxonMobil from bidding on new projects as punishment for plans to work in Kurdistan -- have been at the heart of recent feuding between the two sides.
    "A unified Iraq is at the center of U.S. policy and concerns every neighboring state," Mardini said. "Despite the real financial barriers, the very talk about Kurdish independence still makes everyone uneasy. It's unwise to underestimate the role Kurdish aspirations and fears play in their calculus regarding statehood."

    The Kurdish region in Iraq's north is politically autonomous, although it does receive a share of the nation's $100 billion annual budget. It was created as a haven for the country's ethnic Kurds in the 1970s after years of fighting with the central government. Kurds account for up to 20 percent of Iraq's population; it is unknown how many of them live in the northern region since there has been no census taken for years.

    Neighboring Turkey and Iran have been concerned that an independent and prosperous Iraqi Kurdistan might promote separatism among their own Kurdish minority populations. Iran's semiofficial Mehr news agency reported Wednesday that four troops from Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guards were killed in clashes with Kurdish rebels in western Iran the previous day.

    During the early years of the Iraq war, the U.S. worked hard to ensure that the Kurds remained part of the Iraqi state, encouraging all parties to give the Kurds a major role in the government. Kurdish approval of the Iraqi constitution in 2005 was hailed as a major victory for U.S. policy.

    Relations between the central government in Baghdad and the Kurdish region long have been strained, and Barzani has threatened previously to break off the region from Iraq.
    But Barzani may feel more emboldened now that the U.S. troops have gone, and since talks last week in Ankara signaled a burgeoning partnership between the Kurdish region and neighboring Turkey.
    On Wednesday, Barzani signaled he was impatient with requests by President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden for the Kurds to work with the al-Maliki government.
    "They reiterated they support a federal, democratic, pluralistic, united Iraq. And I reassured them that certainly if Iraq is democratic, federal and pluralistic, it will be united," Barzani said. "Certainly, we have reservations about their policy and their attitude."

    "We cannot sit and do nothing or try nothing to remedy the situation."

    Barzani also said he "wholeheartedly" supports Sunni desires to create their own self-rule regions in Iraq. Sunni lawmakers, whose Iraqiya political coalition won the most seats in 2010 parliamentary elections but were outmaneuvered by al-Maliki for the right to form the government, bitterly complain they have no say in Iraq's power structure.

    Sunni lawmaker Hamid al-Mutlaq said many of his constituents have been lukewarm about creating a self-rule Sunni region.

    "But because of the injustice they are experiencing, due to the practices of the government security forces especially concerning arrests, marginalization and double standards, that makes them call for creating these regions," al-Mutlaq said.
    Iraq's top Sunni official, Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi, is wanted on government terrorism charges that his supporters call trumped up and Barzani said Wednesday were politically motivated.
    Lawmaker Ali al-Alak, a member of the State of Law political coalition that al-Maliki leads, said Kurdish secession should not be an option.
    "The problems can't be resolved by issuing threats, but through dialogue," al-Alak said. "If one party tries to impose solutions on others, then this a dictatorship scenario. We are with unity of Iraq and we strongly reject dividing Iraq and its people."

    Others feel it is al-Maliki who is dividing the Iraqi people.

    Al-Maliki kept his job in 2010 only after corralling enough support from Kurdish lawmakers and the hardline followers of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Now, even Sadrist lawmakers are increasingly irritated with the government's long-standing dismissal of their concerns.

    "The current political situation in Iraq is like a time bomb that could explode at any moment," said Sadrist lawmaker Bahaa al-Araji.

    He said the political strain between al-Maliki and the Kurds could be the first domino to fall in a broken Iraq: "Baghdad has the same problems with other provinces," al-Araji said. "This will lead to dividing Iraq, and there will be no Iraq on the world map."





    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/04...#ixzz1tFfUTCm5
    Last edited by Bman; 04-27-2012 at 10:39 AM.
    Of course, none of these extraordinary events would ever have happened if not for Bush and he retires with the most astounding successes achieved by any president in recent memory. -- Mars S, January 2009

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